Categories
Back Catalogue photography politics

The Back Catalogue (3): Images of atrocity, conflict and war

Welcome to the third in “The Back Catalogue” series of posts…

I’ve been actively writing online for nearly three years now, and one of the challenges of the blog format is how to keep old posts with content that is potentially still relevant from slipping off the radar. And because this site combines my research with the blog, an additional challenge has been how to make blog readers aware of other content that might be of interest.

To address that I am identifying a number of key themes from what I’ve published over the last couple of years, pulling together posts and articles that deal with each theme. The first ‘Back Catalogue’ covers work on representations of ‘Africa’ while the second is on photojournalism in the new media economy.

Here, starting with the oldest in each section, are 34 posts and 11 articles on the photographic representations of atrocity, conflict and war.

POSTS

ARTICLES

Imaging the Real, Struggling for Meaning [9/11],” Infopeace, 6 October 2001, Information Technology, War and Peace Project, The Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University.

Atrocity, Memory, Photography: Imaging the Concentration Camps of Bosnia – The Case of ITN versus Living Marxism, Part I,” Journal of Human Rights 1:1 (2002), p. 1-33.

Atrocity, Memory, Photography: Imaging the Concentration Camps of Bosnia – The Case of ITN versus Living Marxism, Part II,” Journal of Human Rights 1:2 (2002), pp. 143-72.

Representing Contemporary War,” Ethics and International Affairs 17 (2) 2003, pp. 99-108.

Cultural Governance and Pictorial Resistance: Reflections on the Imaging of War,” Review of International Studies 29 Special Issue (2003), pp. 57-73.

Horrific Blindness: Images of Death in Contemporary Media,” Journal of Cultural Research 8:1 (2004), 55-74.

Geopolitics and Visual Culture: Sighting the Darfur Conflict 2003-05,” Political Geography 26: 4 (2007), 357-382.

(co-edited with Michael J. Shapiro), “Securitization, Militarization and Visual Culture in the Worlds of post-9/11,” a special issue of Security Dialogue 38 (2) 2007.

Tele-vision: Satellite Images and Security,” Source 56 (Autumn 2008), 16-23.

Constructed Visibility: Photographing the Catastrophe of Gaza,” draft paper, June 2009.

How has photojournalism framed the war in Afghanistan?“, in John Burke and Simon Norfolk, BURKE + NORFOLK: Photographs from the War in Afghanistan (Stockport: Dewi Lewis Publishing, 2011)

UPDATED 10 April 2012

Photo credit: American Marines patrolling in Mogadishu while being closely followed by the global media circus during ‘Operation Restore Hope’ (1992). Copyright Paul Lowe/Panos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories
Back Catalogue media economy photography

The Back Catalogue (2): Photojournalism in the new media economy

Welcome to the second in “The Back Catalogue” series of posts…

I’ve been actively writing online for nearly three years now, and one of the challenges of the blog format is how to keep old posts with content that is potentially still relevant from slipping off the radar. And because this site combines my research with the blog, an additional challenge has been how to make blog readers aware of other content that might be of interest.

To address that I am identifying a number of key themes from what I’ve published over the last couple of years, pulling together posts and articles that deal with each theme. The first ‘Back Catalogue’ covered work on representations of ‘Africa’, and the third deals with representations of atrocity, conflict and war.

Here, starting with the oldest in each section, are analyses of documentary photography and photojournalism in the new media economy – specifically the challenges for creative practice and story-telling, challenges for the industry given the disruptive power of the Internet, and new ways of thinking about doing business and funding photographic projects.

Posts: challenges for creative practice

Posts: challenges for the industry

Posts: new ways of doing business and funding work

Posts: other sites

 

UPDATED 10 April 2012

Photo: drewm/Flickr, used under a Creative Commons license

Categories
Back Catalogue photography politics

The Back Catalogue (1): Representing ‘Africa’

Welcome to “The Back Catalogue,” the first in an occasional series of themed posts…

I’ve been actively writing online for nearly three years now, and one of the challenges of the blog format is how to keep old posts with content that is potentially still relevant from slipping off the radar. And because this site combines my research with the blog, an additional challenge has been how to make blog readers aware of other content that might be of interest.

To address that I am identifying a number of key themes from what I’ve published over the last couple of years, pulling together posts and articles that deal with each theme. The second post in the series deals with photojournalism in the new media economy, while the third covers representations of atrocity, conflict and war.

Here, starting with the oldest, here are items dealing in various ways with the visual representation of ‘Africa’.

POSTS:

ARTICLES:

Salgado and the Sahel: Documentary Photography and the Imaging of Famine,” in Rituals of Mediation: International Politics and Social Meaning, edited by Francois Debrix and Cindy Weber (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003), pp. 69-96

Geopolitics and Visual Culture: Sighting the Darfur Conflict 2003-05,” Political Geography 26: 4 (2007), 357-382.

The Visual Economy of HIV/AIDS as a Security Issue, 135 pages, research report for the AIDS, Security and Conflict Initiative, May 2008.

“‘Black Skin and Blood’: Documentary Photography and Santu Mofokeng’s Critique of the Visualization of Apartheid South Africa,History and Theory 48 (4) 2009, 52-58.

(with Marcus Power) “The Scopic Regime of ‘Africa’,” in Observant States: Geopolitics and Visual Culture, edited by Fraser Macdonald, Klaus Dodds and Rachel Hughes (London: I.B. Tauris, 2010).

The Iconography of Famine,” in Picturing Atrocity: Reading Photographs in Crisis, edited by Geoffrey Batchen, Mick Gidley, Nancy K. Miller, Jay Prosser (London: Reaktion Books, in press, forthcoming 2011).

PROJECTS:

Imaging Famine (2005)

 

UPDATED 10 April 2012

Photo: globevisions michele molinari, Flickr, used under a Creative Commons license.