Imaging famine: How critique can help

August 19, 2011 · by David Campbell · photography, politics

NYT cover 10241 e1322709242647 Imaging famine: How critique can help

What is the point of critique, and how can it help produce better visual stories?

According to Jonathan Jones (writing in the Guardian on 22 July) all the sophisticated critiques of photojournalism are pointless when it comes to picturing famine:

It seems shocking that commentators…wasted their breath on the ethics of a photograph instead of urging action to deal with the suffering it showed. The fact that people far away can see with visceral immediacy the facts of a crisis like the one now hitting the Horn of Africa is one of the most optimistic aspects of the modern world. Consciences are awakened by the camera.

Jones’s own critique is simplistic – either you see or you don’t, visibility is better than blindness, and images provoke conscience. The last point demands more consideration, but in casting the issue in terms of a simple either/or proposition of seeing or not seeing, Jones misses the big picture. The issue is HOW we see, what effect does a particular way of seeing have on our understanding of the issue, and how might we see more effectively?

I’ve been debating related issues with Jon Levy, and yesterday we participated in a productive OPEN-i forum that revealed both much common ground and some continuing differences. As a result I wanted to set out a series of propositions that encapsulate my thinking on how we can contribute to a better visual account of famine.

1. Critique is not negative, and does not involve blaming photographers.

A critique is an intervention in established modes of action and thought. Such interventions try and disturb those practices which are settled, untie what appears to be sown up, and render as produced that which claims to be natural. There is an ethical imperative behind such interventions, a desire to open up possibilities being foreclosed or suppressed by that which exists. Intervening involves a questioning of what is established, that questioning follows from a concern or dissatisfaction with what is settled and appears inevitable, and creates the possibility for the formulation of alternatives. We can’t know where we are going unless we understand where we are now and how we got here. And although discussion necessarily proceeds through examples of particular images by individual photographers, it is not about accusing practitioners of bad faith.

2. There is no distinction between an event and its representation.

The reason we begin photographic critique with images, the individuals who make them and the institutions that distribute them is because they offer a way into thinking about the visual economy through which a disaster like famine is made real for the majority of people. Few if any of us have direct experience of disasters, so we necessarily rely on mediated knowledge. That means our reality comes through representation. NGO officials understand this. As Don Redding once observed, “the construction of the event (the humanitarian emergency) becomes the event – for the purposes of public opinion and policy flow.” To engage the event, and how we should respond to the event, demands an analysis of the event’s representation (some of which is discussed in posts reflecting on recent photographic and broadcast coverage.)

3. Famine is made real through a particular visual tradition, and we continue to see it.

The 2003 cover of the New York Times magazine above, with 36 portraits of malnourished children from dozens of different countries over a 50-year period, illustrates the dominant way of representing this sort of disaster. It has been common from the nineteenth century, as we showed in the 2005 Imaging Famine exhibition.

In the current picture galleries from East Africa, we see much of the same (see herehere and here). There has been little if any evolution in the way famine is represented. The problem is that these images individualise an economic and political issue, and focus our attention on passive victims awaiting external assistance.

In the OPEN-i debate Jon argued that these photographs “show you what’s going on.” I think that the stereotypes are politically necessary in certain contexts, and it’s possible to make a case for their use, as Tyler Hicks and Bill Keller of the New York Times have done. But the major problem is that the stereotypes do not show us what is going on. They show us only the end of a process. They show only the final, fatal stages of food insecurity. Most of the issue remains obscured by their continual reproduction.

4. Famine is not a natural disaster, and photography needs to get to grips with this.

While the fact East Africa is suffering the worst drought in 60 years provided the hook for most recent coverage, the disaster is not natural. Indeed, few if any disasters these days are natural. When an earthquake of the same magnitude kills hundreds of thousands in Haiti, but less than a hundred in San Francisco, the differing death toll is not simply a result of the earth moving.

According to the World Bank’s lead economist for Kenya, Wolfgang Fengler, “this crisis is manmade…Droughts have occurred over and again, but you need bad policymaking for that to lead to a famine.”

Famines, paradoxically, are also not simply the result of food shortages. As Cambridge lecturer David Nally observes, during the Irish famine food exports continued while people starved, and Bengal in 1943 (memorably recorded by Werner Bischof) saw hundreds of thousands perish even though that part of India had its biggest rice harvest ever:

The historical study of famine shows that the people of countries that are nominally resource-rich can starve because those resources are extracted to meet the needs of a global economy rather than the nutritional needs of local populations. The recent use of African land to grow crops for biofuels is particularly instructive: filling the tank of a sport utility vehicle, for instance, uses 450 lbs of corn – enough food to feed one person for an entire year. Thus policies designed to enhance the ‘food and energy security’ of relatively affluent places, such as Europe, can compromise the security of peoples in Africa. Today, as in the nineteenth century, life and death decisions of a terrifying scale are woven in the fabric of international economic relations.

These issues cannot be encapsulated within a single photographic frame, and representing them in their complexity is not simply photography’s responsibility. But I don’t see any examples from the current crisis in East Africa that even gestures towards these larger issues. Of course, correct me if I am wrong.

5. What now?

With more than 12 million people in urgent need of humanitarian assistance, and some areas of Somali having more than 40% of children under five suffering from acute malnutrition, their situation has to be pictured.

But, as with the coverage of Japan, Egypt and Libya this year, East Africa is being covered by a relatively large number of excellent photographers that surely means there is scope for someone to do something different. Do all of them have to go to Banadir hospital in Mogadishu to photograph fly blown, emaciated children? Could not some of them record audio as well as shoot photos so we can hear from the people affected? Can’t their editors push for alternatives and offer greater support to achieve them? Is it beyond our collective capacity to follow the leads from critical questioning and see what’s really going on with famine?

11 Responses to “Imaging famine: How critique can help”

  1. Hi, David.

    One of the productive ambiguities in your critique is the way in which you refuse or forget to define “better” (“a better visual account of famine”, “produce better visual stories”). Better by whose or what standards? That is, wouldn’t the criteria by which we judge “better” photos of starving people necessitate the articulation of a politics first?

    But as your article unintentionally suggests, perhaps the best picture of a malnourished Somali is an American parking lot full of SVUs or commodity traders betting on corn futures. Unfortunately that kind of critical representation is only possible in places like Adbusters, a publication that at least wears its politics on its sleeve, whereas the NYT magazine assumes the inevitable hegemony of Neoliberalism and thus feels no need to question its legitimacy through photographs.

    Do we have to start thinking in old Left terms of “a photography of resistance” versus “a photography of domination”? Or should we start questioning the practice of representation entirely, which would set us down the path of renouncing photojournalism itself?

    -jacob mundy

    • Jacob, apologies for the belated reply. Yes, ‘better’ is not something I seek to tightly define, though you easily discerned dimensions of it relating to context. I prefer to leave it open to an extent, though I don’t think its too difficult to read between the lines to see the broad outline of a better direction. While that should involve questioning the politics of representation per se, I don’t think that means renouncing photojournalism per se.

  2. I mean, there SHOULD be a better way to get to the bottom of this thing called famine….which is only brought about by bad government and rifle-wielding criminals! Those starving people are the symptom….but nobody is making the cause visual, because the cause won’t LET itself be photographed.

    • Thanks for the comment. ‘Causes’ aren’t things that easily leave visible traces – its up to visual story tellers to understand the context, know the possible causes, and find ways to manifest those elements in a narrative. That will always been an imperfect process as no story can encompass everything or represent all things, but some much of the context remains unreported and unconnected.

  3. Misha, interesting comment, thanks, especially the information from the field. I think you’re right that one problem is the lack of subsequent coverage. Another is the lack of prior coverage. ‘Famine’ is always late and the stereotypical pictures come too late for most. We need to find away to enable ongoing coverage, before and after, as well as during.

  1. [...] comments, and my response in another post, Imaging Famine: A Debate. After our OPEN-i debate, I wrote a post summarising some points from the discussion to underscore my belief in the necessity ….   # # AfricaEthiopiafaminehumanitarianismOxfamPeter GillphotographyphotojournalismRobin [...]

  2. [...] and I pursed this discussion in an OPEN-it debate on 18 August 2011, and I wrote a subsequent post summarising points from that debate while underlining my belief in the nec…. # # [...]

  3. [...] thoughtfulness and determination, making his work a welcome antidote to the all too frequent (and arguably unhelpful) media images of destitute and starving Africans, which fail to show the bigger picture. But by [...]

  4. [...] of imaging famine. Campbell is also very open about discussing various aspects of photojournalism. This post, on his site is a follow-up to a debate on imaging famine. In it, Campbell looks at how critique of [...]

Leave a Reply